Table Wine Asheville - Valpolicellas of the Tezza Family

Understanding Valpolicella: Free “Try Before You Buy” Tasting – Saturday, July 27th., 2013 – 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

This Saturday, we’ll be tasting and discussing wines from the Valpolicella zone of the Veneto region of Italy.  Valpolicella is first and foremost a region located in the northeastern part of Italy.  The vineyards are situated around the city of Verona, just east of Lake Garda and wines labeled Valpolicella are always red.  The grapes used to make the wines, from the simplest to the most grandiose are Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara, and there are different qualitative “levels” of Valpolicella. 

At the entry point, you have a simple, juicy, typically red fruited version known simply as Valpolicella.  The ultimate and most regal wine of the region is called Amarone della Valpolicella, which is made with grapes harvested later and dried for 120 days before fermentation occurs.  And in the middle you have Ripasso which literally means “repassed”.   With this technique, the juice of a Valpolicella is added to the pomace of leftover grape skins and seeds in the Amarone barrels.  At the end of the day, it is a zone that produces a number of diverse styles of wines, and we’re going to let you taste a couple of different interpretations today.  

 – 2012 Tezza Campo di Majoli – Here’s sort of a “riff” on a Valpolicella.  Based on 70% Corvina and 30% Cabernet Sauvignon fermented entirely in stainless steel, it is round, rich and juicy, with a nice core of berry fruit and hints of chocolate and warm spice.
Regular Price: $14.99
Tasting Price: $13.49/$12.74/$11.99 

– 2010 Tezza “Ma Roat” Valpolicella Ripasso – Ma Roat is a blend of Corvina and Rondinella made using the Ripasso style, discussed above.  It is fermented entirely in stainless steel and offers up classic Ripasso notes of fresh berries and dark spices.
Regular Price: $14.99
Tasting Price: $13.49/$12.74/$11.99 

The tasting wines are 10% off by the bottle, 15% off if you mix six of them and 20% off if you mix twelve of them.

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *